Sneaky turtles may create ‘decoy nests’ to throw off predators

New research focusing on post-nesting behaviour has shown that hawksbill and leatherback turtles randomly scatter sand surrounding their nests, to give the impression there are multiple nests grouped together, possibly in an attempt to confuse and deter egg predators. Turtle nesting is a key area of research in marine biology that is crucial to understanding … More Sneaky turtles may create ‘decoy nests’ to throw off predators

Colourful bleaching: solving a coral conundrum

A new study has finally solved a puzzle amongst coral scientists as to why some reefs end up glowing in multi-colour after bleaching, instead of turning the usual ghostly white. It turns out that this strange anomaly may also be a good thing for coral reefs. There are few sights as distressing for marine biologists … More Colourful bleaching: solving a coral conundrum

Cartilage regeneration in little skates could hold the key to human therapies

A recent study by a group of researchers, from the University of Cambridge and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, has shown that little skates have an extraordinary ability to regenerate the cartilage in their skeletons, which could lead to potential treatments in humans. Cartilage is the resilient elastic tissue that surrounds our bones and the … More Cartilage regeneration in little skates could hold the key to human therapies

Newly discovered deep sea microbes can turn CO2 back into fuel

Researchers from Germany have discovered deep-sea microbes that can convert ethane and methane, the main components of natural gas, into CO2 and other by-products. In addition to this the process seems to be reversible and they can turn the greenhouse gas back into fuel. Unlike animals, that can only eat fats, carbohydrates and proteins, microbial … More Newly discovered deep sea microbes can turn CO2 back into fuel

Saving room for shrimp: intelligent meal selection in cuttlefish

A new study from Cambridge University researchers has revealed that cuttlefish will eat less crab during the daytime, if there is the promise of the superior tasting shrimp in the evening. This level of decision making and planning is a sign of their often underestimated intelligence. If you’ve ever planned to go out to your … More Saving room for shrimp: intelligent meal selection in cuttlefish

Ocean acidification may cause corrosion of shark skin

Future acidic ocean conditions could corrode the minerals in the strong scale-like skin of sharks, it could lead to reduce swimming capabilities and exposure to increased CO2 in their blood. As our oceans become increasingly warm as a result of climate change, they are also becoming increasingly acidic as an increased amount of atmospheric CO2 … More Ocean acidification may cause corrosion of shark skin

Do seabirds have a better sense of hearing underwater than in air?

A new study into the hearing of great cormorants shows that they have a better sense of hearing in water than they do above the surface. It is another example of how underwater sound may be much more important to seabirds than previously thought. Only recently the first ever recorded vocalisations of seabirds made underwater … More Do seabirds have a better sense of hearing underwater than in air?

Underwater vocalisations in penguins captured for the first time

It has long been suspected that penguins make noises underwater, but it has never actually been proved. Now an accidental discovery has shown that it does in fact happen across multiple species. Penguins are known amongst researchers as one of the noisiest seabirds on the planet. On land they are constantly calling to one another … More Underwater vocalisations in penguins captured for the first time

Octopuses & MS: linking multiple arms to multiple sclerosis

Written by Zuzanna Dusza In a recent study, published in the journal Medical Hypotheses, an Iranian neurologist has suggested that octopuses may provide some insight into curing Multiple sclerosis (MS). This might sound like the plot of a rather mediocre sci-fi movie, but the new paper lays out some compelling arguments as to how octopus … More Octopuses & MS: linking multiple arms to multiple sclerosis