New device could unravel the microscopic mysteries of plankton

Scientists from Stanford University have created a revolutionary new device which can study individual plankton movements in simulated oceanic conditions. It is hoped it will open up a whole new field of research into these microscopic organisms and the crucial roles they play in global systems. Despite their microscopic size, plankton are one of the … More New device could unravel the microscopic mysteries of plankton

Chemical in sea whips can be re-created to treat multi-drug resistant TB

A new technique by researchers in Germany allows for a special antibiotic compound in sea whips to be re-created without the need for harvesting or destroying the soft corals it is found in. In addition to helping treat multi-drug resistant tuberculosis, this process could also be used to create other useful medicines. Sea whips (also … More Chemical in sea whips can be re-created to treat multi-drug resistant TB

Satellite-tagged seals and underwater robots uncover new ocean currents

Two new studies from the University of Gothenburg, utilizing novel research techniques involving tagged elephant seals and robotic gliders, have uncovered new small-scale ocean currents in the Southern Ocean and highlighted their big importance. As the technology available to researchers has improved over time, the only limiting factor to what can be uncovered about our … More Satellite-tagged seals and underwater robots uncover new ocean currents

Scientists finish first completely remote ocean expedition during lockdown

A team of researchers, in association with the Schmidt Ocean Institute, have completed an in depth 46-day scientific exploration of the Coral Sea Marine Park in Eastern Australia, all from the comfort of their own homes during the coronavirus lockdown. Over the past few months most of the world has stayed at home as we … More Scientists finish first completely remote ocean expedition during lockdown

New species of ‘glitter worms’ discovered in the deep

Researchers have recently described four new species of deep-sea scale worms with beautiful iridescent scales and sparkly bristle-like hairs. Nicknamed ‘glitter worms’ these new species are not just visually stunning but also extremely interesting. On land worms are arguably one of the most simple and un-interesting animals you can find, but under the waves their … More New species of ‘glitter worms’ discovered in the deep

Sneaky turtles may create ‘decoy nests’ to throw off predators

New research focusing on post-nesting behaviour has shown that hawksbill and leatherback turtles randomly scatter sand surrounding their nests, to give the impression there are multiple nests grouped together, possibly in an attempt to confuse and deter egg predators. Turtle nesting is a key area of research in marine biology that is crucial to understanding … More Sneaky turtles may create ‘decoy nests’ to throw off predators

Colourful bleaching: solving a coral conundrum

A new study has finally solved a puzzle amongst coral scientists as to why some reefs end up glowing in multi-colour after bleaching, instead of turning the usual ghostly white. It turns out that this strange anomaly may also be a good thing for coral reefs. There are few sights as distressing for marine biologists … More Colourful bleaching: solving a coral conundrum

Cartilage regeneration in little skates could hold the key to human therapies

A recent study by a group of researchers, from the University of Cambridge and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, has shown that little skates have an extraordinary ability to regenerate the cartilage in their skeletons, which could lead to potential treatments in humans. Cartilage is the resilient elastic tissue that surrounds our bones and the … More Cartilage regeneration in little skates could hold the key to human therapies

Newly discovered deep sea microbes can turn CO2 back into fuel

Researchers from Germany have discovered deep-sea microbes that can convert ethane and methane, the main components of natural gas, into CO2 and other by-products. In addition to this the process seems to be reversible and they can turn the greenhouse gas back into fuel. Unlike animals, that can only eat fats, carbohydrates and proteins, microbial … More Newly discovered deep sea microbes can turn CO2 back into fuel