Unholy matrimony: the nightmarish sex lives of anglerfish

Deep-sea anglerfish have one of the most bizarre and disturbing mating behaviours in the animal kingdom, known as sexual parasitism, where dwarf males bite into and then permanently fuse bodies with larger females. However as off-putting as this may sound, it is actually a remarkably effective strategy. Sexual reproduction is one of the most important … More Unholy matrimony: the nightmarish sex lives of anglerfish

Scientists finish first completely remote ocean expedition during lockdown

A team of researchers, in association with the Schmidt Ocean Institute, have completed an in depth 46-day scientific exploration of the Coral Sea Marine Park in Eastern Australia, all from the comfort of their own homes during the coronavirus lockdown. Over the past few months most of the world has stayed at home as we … More Scientists finish first completely remote ocean expedition during lockdown

Surprisingly fast growth rates discovered in deep-sea corals

New research from the University of Hawai’i has shown that the deep-sea corals Leptoseris can grow at a much faster rate than previously realised. It challenges the widely held assumption that deeper corals living on the brink of darkness grow extremely slowly. When you think of corals you normally picture diverse and colourful structures in … More Surprisingly fast growth rates discovered in deep-sea corals

The potential benefits of COVID-19 on marine wildlife

Written by Rebecca Greatorex As we continue to experience a global pandemic on a scale many of us have never seen before, I would like to discuss a rather overlooked group of animals which have also been affected by this global crisis – marine creatures. However, unlike us, they are likely to be affected in … More The potential benefits of COVID-19 on marine wildlife

New map gives us our best look yet at hydrothermal vents

A new paper by researchers from MBARI has revealed the true extent of the famous Endeavour Segment of hydrothermal vents in the Pacific Northwest. Their high resolution map of 572 chimneys has changed what we know about this region and hydrothermal vents in general, as well as opening up new possibilities for researchers. Hydrothermal vents … More New map gives us our best look yet at hydrothermal vents

New species of ‘glitter worms’ discovered in the deep

Researchers have recently described four new species of deep-sea scale worms with beautiful iridescent scales and sparkly bristle-like hairs. Nicknamed ‘glitter worms’ these new species are not just visually stunning but also extremely interesting. On land worms are arguably one of the most simple and un-interesting animals you can find, but under the waves their … More New species of ‘glitter worms’ discovered in the deep

Book Club: ‘Sex in the Sea’ by Marah J. Hardt

‘Tales of marine love that are often as hilarious as they are disturbing’ – New York Post Combining a wealth of important information and intriguing innuendos, Dr Marah J. Hardt’s ‘Sex in the Sea’ provides a delightful insight into the reproductive behaviours of a range of marine creatures in our oceans. From gender-fluid fish and … More Book Club: ‘Sex in the Sea’ by Marah J. Hardt

Colourful bleaching: solving a coral conundrum

A new study has finally solved a puzzle amongst coral scientists as to why some reefs end up glowing in multi-colour after bleaching, instead of turning the usual ghostly white. It turns out that this strange anomaly may also be a good thing for coral reefs. There are few sights as distressing for marine biologists … More Colourful bleaching: solving a coral conundrum

Cartilage regeneration in little skates could hold the key to human therapies

A recent study by a group of researchers, from the University of Cambridge and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, has shown that little skates have an extraordinary ability to regenerate the cartilage in their skeletons, which could lead to potential treatments in humans. Cartilage is the resilient elastic tissue that surrounds our bones and the … More Cartilage regeneration in little skates could hold the key to human therapies