Surprisingly fast growth rates discovered in deep-sea corals

New research from the University of Hawai’i has shown that the deep-sea corals Leptoseris can grow at a much faster rate than previously realised. It challenges the widely held assumption that deeper corals living on the brink of darkness grow extremely slowly. When you think of corals you normally picture diverse and colourful structures in … More Surprisingly fast growth rates discovered in deep-sea corals

New map gives us our best look yet at hydrothermal vents

A new paper by researchers from MBARI has revealed the true extent of the famous Endeavour Segment of hydrothermal vents in the Pacific Northwest. Their high resolution map of 572 chimneys has changed what we know about this region and hydrothermal vents in general, as well as opening up new possibilities for researchers. Hydrothermal vents … More New map gives us our best look yet at hydrothermal vents

How low can we go? The importance & impacts of deep sea mining

Written by Jenny Hickman For centuries, the high seas have been a place of exploitation and misuse. The “out of sight, out of mind” attitude that pervades offshore activity has resulted in the ocean becoming steadily depleted of fish stocks and filling up with anthropogenic waste. For far too long it was believed that the … More How low can we go? The importance & impacts of deep sea mining

Book club: ‘The Deep’ by Alex Rogers

‘This book takes an unflinching look at the issues affecting our oceans’ – National Geographic Dr Alex Rogers is a world-renowned marine biologist with over 30 years’ experience in deep-sea exploration. He is the director of science at REV Ocean, a professor in conservation biology at Oxford University and was also a scientific advisor for … More Book club: ‘The Deep’ by Alex Rogers

Newly discovered deep sea microbes can turn CO2 back into fuel

Researchers from Germany have discovered deep-sea microbes that can convert ethane and methane, the main components of natural gas, into CO2 and other by-products. In addition to this the process seems to be reversible and they can turn the greenhouse gas back into fuel. Unlike animals, that can only eat fats, carbohydrates and proteins, microbial … More Newly discovered deep sea microbes can turn CO2 back into fuel

Massive stringy creature adopts UFO-like feeding shape in deep sea discovery

A new video captured during a deep sea expedition has revealed an alien looking ‘silly string’ creature hunting prey in a mesmerizing disc-like shape. It is believed to be the biggest creature of its kind ever recorded and emphasizes how little we really know about the deep oceans. By now it should come as no … More Massive stringy creature adopts UFO-like feeding shape in deep sea discovery