Book Club: ‘The Island of Sea Women’ by Lisa See

Little is known about Jeju- a Korean island- occupied by brutal Japanese troops in the 1930s and ’40s, later liberated by US forces and turned over to the even more barbarous Korean regime whose wrongdoings were overlooked by both American and U.N. occupiers. Lisa See travels back 75 years to these horrifying events and weaves … More Book Club: ‘The Island of Sea Women’ by Lisa See

Culture Club: Time to let the cetaceans in?

Up until recently, culture has been thought of as a primarily human characteristic. However, recent studies shine a light on the fact that non-human animals including Cetaceans (dolphins and whales), may also possess it. They live in tightly-knit social communities, exhibit complex social behaviours, talk to one another and even have pod-specific dialects! A lot … More Culture Club: Time to let the cetaceans in?

Book club: ‘Being Salmon Being Human’ by Martin Lee Mueller

Encountering the Wild in Us and Us in the Wild Norwegian and Pacific Northwest salmon industries remain largely overlooked and Martin Lee Mueller cleverly weaves the stories of artificially inseminated and reared salmon to highlight the long-standing notion of human exceptionalism and creates a critique of the widespread idea that non-human animals are little more … More Book club: ‘Being Salmon Being Human’ by Martin Lee Mueller

Book club: ‘Spineless’ by Juli Berwald

“The story of jellyfish… is a significant part of the environmental story. Berwald’s engaging account of these delicate, often ignored creatures shows how much they matter to our ocean’s future” – New York Times If you were to write a list of the most interesting and important creatures in our oceans the humble jellyfish is … More Book club: ‘Spineless’ by Juli Berwald

Pacific salmon hatcheries: More greed than a good deed?

In the American Northwest, one of the main strategies to supposedly save endangered wild salmon has been the creation of hatcheries. While initially, this seemed to boost wild stocks and increase total biomass, the release of hatchery-reared salmon is now seen as more of a problem in itself than a ‘solution to’.  While a landmark … More Pacific salmon hatcheries: More greed than a good deed?

Solar-powered sea slugs chop off their heads and grow new bodies

It is one of the “most extreme” examples of animal regeneration ever seen. Two species of sea slugs can pop off their heads and regrow their entire bodies from the noggin down, scientists in Japan recently discovered. This incredible feat of regeneration can be achieved in just a couple of weeks and is absolutely mind-blowing. … More Solar-powered sea slugs chop off their heads and grow new bodies

Baby it’s cold outside: Freezing in marine animals

Written by Rebecca Greatorex Freezing of animals is probably a concept you haven’t given much thought to. As humans, we can put on a hat and coat and survive out in the snow for hours on end. This is because we are endothermic, which means we produce our own heat. Some arctic animals like whales … More Baby it’s cold outside: Freezing in marine animals

Catch me if you can! Cephalopod defences & predator avoidance

Written by Rhodri Irranca “An old trick well done is far better than a new trick with no effect.”– Harry Houdini. Gargantuan ocean-dwelling beasts have been depicted globally in folklore since the dawn of human existence, such as the kraken described by Pontoppidan in his mid-18th century work “The Natural History of Norway”. Subsequent works … More Catch me if you can! Cephalopod defences & predator avoidance

Book club: ‘The Brilliant Abyss’ by Helen Scales

True Tales of Exploring the Deep Sea, Discovering Hidden Life and Selling the Seabed The deep sea is the least explored ecosystem on Earth and as a result our understanding of the creatures that live there and the vital roles they play have long been overlooked. But with advancements in technologies and a long list … More Book club: ‘The Brilliant Abyss’ by Helen Scales