Unholy matrimony: the nightmarish sex lives of anglerfish

Deep-sea anglerfish have one of the most bizarre and disturbing mating behaviours in the animal kingdom, known as sexual parasitism, where dwarf males bite into and then permanently fuse bodies with larger females. However as off-putting as this may sound, it is actually a remarkably effective strategy. Sexual reproduction is one of the most important … More Unholy matrimony: the nightmarish sex lives of anglerfish

Scientists finish first completely remote ocean expedition during lockdown

A team of researchers, in association with the Schmidt Ocean Institute, have completed an in depth 46-day scientific exploration of the Coral Sea Marine Park in Eastern Australia, all from the comfort of their own homes during the coronavirus lockdown. Over the past few months most of the world has stayed at home as we … More Scientists finish first completely remote ocean expedition during lockdown

Book Club: ‘Vast Expanses’ by Helen M. Rozwadowski

‘A timely and useful oceancentric natural history of the ocean-human relationship… Rozwadowski thoroughly brings readers up to date on the essential issues of marine exploration, research and the environment’ – Booklist In ‘Vast Expanses: A History of the Oceans’ author Helen M. Rozwadowski delivers a complete yet concise retelling of the human-ocean relationship through both … More Book Club: ‘Vast Expanses’ by Helen M. Rozwadowski

What is fisheries-induced evolution?

Written by George Brett Since the concept of shifting baseline syndrome was first outlined in 1995, particular attention has been paid to the historical data regarding the size and levels of fish landings. Given the difficult nature of establishing accurate records, researchers have often turned to alternative means of gathering the data instead. One such … More What is fisheries-induced evolution?

Surprisingly fast growth rates discovered in deep-sea corals

New research from the University of Hawai’i has shown that the deep-sea corals Leptoseris can grow at a much faster rate than previously realised. It challenges the widely held assumption that deeper corals living on the brink of darkness grow extremely slowly. When you think of corals you normally picture diverse and colourful structures in … More Surprisingly fast growth rates discovered in deep-sea corals

The potential benefits of COVID-19 on marine wildlife

Written by Rebecca Greatorex As we continue to experience a global pandemic on a scale many of us have never seen before, I would like to discuss a rather overlooked group of animals which have also been affected by this global crisis – marine creatures. However, unlike us, they are likely to be affected in … More The potential benefits of COVID-19 on marine wildlife

Large number of microscopic organisms found living on the shells of turtles

New research has revealed that the shells of loggerhead turtles can support entire communities of microscopic life with a much greater abundance and diversity than previously realised, raising important questions about marine meiofauna and loggerhead conservation. Throughout the animal kingdom large animals have always played host to microscopic life, whether they are aware of it … More Large number of microscopic organisms found living on the shells of turtles

New map gives us our best look yet at hydrothermal vents

A new paper by researchers from MBARI has revealed the true extent of the famous Endeavour Segment of hydrothermal vents in the Pacific Northwest. Their high resolution map of 572 chimneys has changed what we know about this region and hydrothermal vents in general, as well as opening up new possibilities for researchers. Hydrothermal vents … More New map gives us our best look yet at hydrothermal vents