What is fisheries-induced evolution?

Written by George Brett Since the concept of shifting baseline syndrome was first outlined in 1995, particular attention has been paid to the historical data regarding the size and levels of fish landings. Given the difficult nature of establishing accurate records, researchers have often turned to alternative means of gathering the data instead. One such … More What is fisheries-induced evolution?

Surprisingly fast growth rates discovered in deep-sea corals

New research from the University of Hawai’i has shown that the deep-sea corals Leptoseris can grow at a much faster rate than previously realised. It challenges the widely held assumption that deeper corals living on the brink of darkness grow extremely slowly. When you think of corals you normally picture diverse and colourful structures in … More Surprisingly fast growth rates discovered in deep-sea corals

The potential benefits of COVID-19 on marine wildlife

Written by Rebecca Greatorex As we continue to experience a global pandemic on a scale many of us have never seen before, I would like to discuss a rather overlooked group of animals which have also been affected by this global crisis – marine creatures. However, unlike us, they are likely to be affected in … More The potential benefits of COVID-19 on marine wildlife

Large number of microscopic organisms found living on the shells of turtles

New research has revealed that the shells of loggerhead turtles can support entire communities of microscopic life with a much greater abundance and diversity than previously realised, raising important questions about marine meiofauna and loggerhead conservation. Throughout the animal kingdom large animals have always played host to microscopic life, whether they are aware of it … More Large number of microscopic organisms found living on the shells of turtles

New map gives us our best look yet at hydrothermal vents

A new paper by researchers from MBARI has revealed the true extent of the famous Endeavour Segment of hydrothermal vents in the Pacific Northwest. Their high resolution map of 572 chimneys has changed what we know about this region and hydrothermal vents in general, as well as opening up new possibilities for researchers. Hydrothermal vents … More New map gives us our best look yet at hydrothermal vents

New species of ‘glitter worms’ discovered in the deep

Researchers have recently described four new species of deep-sea scale worms with beautiful iridescent scales and sparkly bristle-like hairs. Nicknamed ‘glitter worms’ these new species are not just visually stunning but also extremely interesting. On land worms are arguably one of the most simple and un-interesting animals you can find, but under the waves their … More New species of ‘glitter worms’ discovered in the deep

Can this smart mask really revolutionise scuba diving?

The D-mask is an advanced full-face mask that could change the way we scuba dive forever, with a built in display, 1800 view and communication system, but will it live up to its game changing potential or fail to live up to the hype? Nowadays it seems like everything in our lives are becoming ‘smart’ … More Can this smart mask really revolutionise scuba diving?

Sneaky turtles may create ‘decoy nests’ to throw off predators

New research focusing on post-nesting behaviour has shown that hawksbill and leatherback turtles randomly scatter sand surrounding their nests, to give the impression there are multiple nests grouped together, possibly in an attempt to confuse and deter egg predators. Turtle nesting is a key area of research in marine biology that is crucial to understanding … More Sneaky turtles may create ‘decoy nests’ to throw off predators